Wednesday, March 13, 2013

Two movies, worthwhile to watch them!

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Some weeks ago I watched a couple of interesting movies which deal with the condition of human bonds: Before Sunset and Before Sunrise.  The dynamic of the conversation, the subtle exploration of individuals' feelings, the presentation of the vulnerability as a constituent of any person, the mystery of everyday contact with new people make these two movies worthwhile to watch them. Along this two movies, the viewer not only can clearly perceive the connection and magic that exists in any personal interaction, but feel the stress people experience when taking decisions that inevitably affect their lives as well.  The viewer can also advert the role of fortune plays on our daily life.  In my opinion these are two of the most memorable movies owing to its clarity and simplicity with which addresses issues related to ordinary life and personal ties. Both movies are connected by the plot and actors - in fact, they are part of the same dramatic story.  The simple way of presenting the process of falling in love, the maturation of the life, experiences of frustration and excitement exert a powerful draw on me.  I dare say they are a very human film.  

Before Sunrise (1995) tells the story of Jesse, an American college student traveling through Europe after braking off the relationship with his girlfriend.  It seems that the goal of his trip is to keep away any memory of her. On his way from Budapest to Vienna meets Celine, a beautiful French girl who travels to Paris after visiting her grandmother to whom she felt deeply bond.  After a long conversation in the train and a large interchange of mutual flirtatious smile, Jesse convinces the girl to stay with him in Vienna walking and exploring the city. Both spend exciting hours talking about religion, politics, the meaning of life and death, fate. The Intellectual curiosity and empathy are common topics among them that keep the couple together, and make them communicate with great emotional intensity.   During their time together, the magnificent Viennese scenarios play a singular and romantic role as well. They fall in love each other, but they know it will end at dawn, when everyone must leave for their own destination.  Without asking each other for personal information such as address or phone calls they bid farewell each other …. However, they promise each other get together in six months later in the same train station.

Before Sunset (2004) begins nine years after the events narrated above. Jesse has become a writer, and wrote a book about Celine, about that day, and about his feelings for her. It seems it was a way he chose to deal with the absence of the girl, and to face up uncertainty, knowing nothing about her during this nine years.  That book is born of nostalgia and sense of loss:  an feeling that you and me have experienced to some extent, in some way this reminds me Nietzsche's Star frienship (click here). While he is presenting his book in a bookstore in Paris, he again meets Celine. They decide to walk together and talk, to know what happened to each other after so long. It is at this point that the viewer learns that Celine did not attend the meeting in Vienna; Jesse awaited for her in vain that day.   She said that she had lost her grandmother and there was no way to communicate this to him.   The time has passed for both of them, they have reached a certain maturity. Both have consolidated their personal projects, she as an ecologist, and he has deployed his literary vocation and got married. Once again, Jesse invite Celine to spend some hours together as he has to come back America at 5:00 PM. They again talk about their lives. What's interesting about this second film is that the dialogue takes place in real time, you even can feel the tension between them. Later, he persuades her to be on her flat, once there, he sat on the sofa and she starts singing and playing her guitar... then she starts shyly and sensually dancing... However, the time is awfully running  faster than ever, but it seems he has forgotten his flight...    The end is open, as in the original film.


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